Sugar or sleep, which one do you pick most often?

A recent British study seems to confirm something I’ve always known instinctively from my own behavior — people who don’t get enough sleep eat more sugar than those who do.

I know when I was working I regularly would get only 5-6 hours of sleep a night and so eat sugary treats throughout the day to keep going, even though the sugar energy bursts were not all that long-lasting.

Cutting sugar, as found in treats like this, is extremely tough work, confirms a new study.

Now a new study published in  American Journal of Clinical Nutrition reports that people who get at least seven hours sleep a night may be able to eat less sugar than those who get less sleep.

Some participants in the study were counseled on how to get to bed earlier — things like less screen time, not drinking coffee before bed time and establishing a relaxing going-to-bed ritual. Continue reading “Sugar or sleep, which one do you pick most often?”

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2015 — a setback year in my battle against fat and sugar

I gained 14 pounds over the course of the year, but six pounds of that came in December thanks to a trip to the place of my birth, New York City, where I ate all the foods I grew up loving — all high in fat, sugar, salt and calories.

My 2012 angioplasty set me on a path to change my eating habits to lessen the chance of future heart problems. I went on to drop nearly 30 pounds over the first two years after the surgery.

But 2015 proved a setback year for me, so much so that last week I went out to buy some 40-inch-waist pants again, after having thrown out the ones I had back in 2012.

Nathan's hot dogs and waffle fries, wondrous stuff.
Nathan’s hot dogs and waffle fries, wondrous stuff that led to my gaining six pounds in four days of New York City eating

Studies have pointed to increased risk fo heart problems for men with waists larger than 38 or 39 inches.

I’ve hovered between 38 and 40 most of my adult life, getting as high as a 44 at one point. I find my equilibrium waist, the size I feel most comfortable with, is normally around 39, which puts me in dubious territory heart-wise.

So what happened last year? I got tired of always being hungry, for one thing. Also, a variety of external stress factors as the year wore on simply wore down my resolve to eat well.

I gained 14 pounds over the course of the year, but six pounds of that came in December thanks to a trip to the place of my birth, New York City, where I ate all the foods I grew up loving — all high in fat, sugar, salt and calories.

My eating binge continued into the Christmas-New Year’s holidays as I once again ate chocolate and candies I have largely given up.

With a new year here now, it’s time for me to jump back on the low-salt, low-fat, low-sugar bandwagon, which will mean  a return to hunger pangs but, also hopefully, a return to a smaller waist size as I drop enough pounds to go back to my 38-inch-waist pants.

John

 

My second heart walk – a very moving experience

Putting that hat on brought me to tears in 2014, the first year I participated, and it did so again this year.

I recently participated in an annual event here in Chicago, an American Heart Association fund-raising heart walk, that I found profoundly moving for me.

Me with the heart mascot, sporting my survivor's cap and beads for each year since my 2012 surgery.
Me with the heart mascot, sporting my survivor’s cap and beads for each year since my 2012 surgery.

Survivors of heart attacks and strokes receive special heart association baseball caps for the event, red for heart attack survivors, white for stroke survivors. They, I, also get strings of mardi gras-like beads, one for each year they have survived. I received three strands of beads this year, the third since my 2012 angioplasty.

Putting that hat on brought me to tears in 2014, the first year I participated, and it did so again this year. It is the only affirmation I get, really, that I have survived a massively traumatic event and am still alive. Continue reading “My second heart walk – a very moving experience”

Life two years after angioplasty: thinner, hungier and hopefully healthier

But I have to keep reminding my self the days when I lived to eat are over, now I eat to live so I can finish projects and adventures I want to do, such as my recent play-writing and acting.

While this is a food blog and not a health blog, I ask reader indulgence for this post which will talk a bit about my health. I recently had my two-year checkup for my heart following the angioplasty I had done in 2012.

The news was all good. My blood pressure is in normal ranges now, although I take medication to keep it there. And my doctor took my off one of my post-surgery medications, something called beta blockers which slow your heart down. Taking those the past two years meant I always felt I was walking through mud, fighting my way every step, really.

Me, following angioplasty in 2012. I've since lost 23 pounds.
Me, following angioplasty in 2012. I’ve since lost 23 pounds.

I never felt rested and I certainly never felt any of the added energy people kept thinking I should feel after having a major artery unblocked. Sleeping was more fitful and I was constantly constipated, which I’m only now seeing is a side effect of those medications. Continue reading “Life two years after angioplasty: thinner, hungier and hopefully healthier”

Heredity vs. environment for heart disease: which do you think causes it?

I’ve never gotten past thinking the real cause of my problems is simply heredity, given that my father and several aunts and uncles have died of heart attacks.

I started this blog after having an angioplasty in 2012 because current medical science thinks what we eat, our food environement, can impact such things as how or if cholesterol builds up in our arteries to cause the type of major blockages I experienced.

Doctors have put me on cholesterol lowering drugs, even though my cholesterol levels were never in a danger zone prior to my heart troubles, and they’ve advised me to cut the salt, fat and sugar from my diet.

A graphic view of angioplasty
A graphic view of angioplasty

While I’m doing all that hoping it will help, I’ve never gotten past thinking the real cause of my problems is simply heredity, given that my father and several aunts and uncles have died of heart attacks. My heredity argument got some serious reinforcement recently when I read of two studies linking a gene to the possibility of heart problems. Continue reading “Heredity vs. environment for heart disease: which do you think causes it?”

How much salt is too much? Here’s a simple guide

My rule to to try to stay under 1,200 mgs a day since I assume measurements on packaged products or for restaurant nutrition menus can be off a bit. That translates into 400 mgs a meal. That’s for a meal, not a single part of a meal

How much salt is too much for you to eat? General guidelines these days say 2,300 mgs for normal people and 1,500 mgs for those with heart or blood pressure issues (i.e. me) or people 51 or older.

So how do you translate that into meals, especially meals eaten away from home? My rule is to try to stay under 1,200 mgs a day since I assume measurements on packaged products or for restaurant nutrition menus can be off a bit. That translates into 400 mgs a meal. That’s for a meal, not a single part of a meal like a turkey burger or side dish like broccoli or whole wheat pasta.

Sliced meats like this are a no-no on a low-salt diet. Even reduced salt varieties have more salt than you need at one meal.
Sliced meats like this are a no-no on a low-salt diet. Even reduced salt varieties have more salt than you need at one meal.

That’s not much at all. To achieve that level you have to avoid: Continue reading “How much salt is too much? Here’s a simple guide”

Thanksgiving menu: try low-sodium olives to cut salt

The low sodium olives will cost anywhere from 50% to 100% more at retail than the regular ones.

Thanksgiving menu planning can be tricky when you’re on a low-sodium, low-fat, and low-sugar diet. I wrote recently about searching for fresh turkey to avoid frozen and brined ones that can be loaded with salt.

Low soidum olives will save you 25 mgs per serving. It can add up
Low soidum olives will save you 25 mgs per serving. It can add up

But salt is in most everything on a Thanksgiving table, depending on how carefully you shop. Condiments like pickles and olives are loaded with salt, for example. Add them to a harmless salad and you have a salt bomb waiting to explode in you. Continue reading “Thanksgiving menu: try low-sodium olives to cut salt”