Eating fresh means knowing when to dump old food too

Heart-healthy approaches to eating usually emphasize eating a lot of fresh, rather than processed, foods. That means your refrigerator should be stocked with fresh produce, fresh fish and fresh chicken, depending on your tastes.

Start with white meat chicken. Cut it into bite-sized cubes.
How long can you keep chicken in your refrigerator, even after you’ve frozen it? Check this list.

But how long can you keep those before they start to spoil, even in the refrigerator?

WebMD has a handy illustrated guide, although the first thing that struck me about it is that we shouldn’t be eating many fo the items covered here — like deli meats, Mayonnaise, butter, most high-fat ground beef and cheese. Continue reading “Eating fresh means knowing when to dump old food too”

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Don’t be taken in but these food buzzwords

Food processors are getting the message that today’s consumer, especially millennials, want to eat healthier and won’t shop in traditional stores unless they change their product mix to reflect that.

Think anything that says whole grain is healthy? Think again.

But rather than simply make healthier products, some processors have turned to buzzwords that appear to mean healthier while not actually conveying anything healthy about a given food. Don’t be taken in by these terms, read labels and actually study what is in a product before buying it.

Here’s a list from Cooking Light Continue reading “Don’t be taken in but these food buzzwords”

Deli shop much? You shouldn’t, but if you do, check this list

It’s literally been years since I regularly shopped in the deli section of a supermarket. The processed meats there are loaded with salt and fat plus other additives most people, not just those of us with heart issues, should avoid.

But if you still get the urge once and awhile, at least avoid the worst of the worst. WebMD recently posted this Best and Worst Choices From the Deli Section.

Among the best– rotisserie chicken, low-sodium turkey breast, roasted vegetables, bean or lentil salad, coleslaw (the kind without mayo), veggie Quiche and sushi with brown rice.

No more bologna for me, bye-bye old friend.

I’d avoid some of those as well because of high salt content.  I once had a long conversation with cooks at Mariano’s, an upscale chain here in Chicago which specializes in prepared foods and has large buffets in its stores, and was told all their offerings would be considered high in salt content for someone like me. Continue reading “Deli shop much? You shouldn’t, but if you do, check this list”

Expect your food shopping bills to rise in 2018

Last year was a good one for food shoppers with several factors keeping retail prices down. But don’t expect the same in 2018, predicts Cooking Light magazine and the Wall Street Journal.

Smart shopping means buying items low in fat, salt and sugar. Know how to fill your shopping cart while avoiding this evil trio of additives.
Smart shopping means buying items low in fat, salt and sugar. This year, it also will mean watching for sales and bargains as food prices rise.

Commodity prices have been rising but food retailers have absorbed those rather than pass them on to consumers in the face of increased competition from online retailers like Amazon. That could change in 2018. something has to give, basically, retailers can’t keep paying more for what they buy without eventually charging you more for what you buy from them. Continue reading “Expect your food shopping bills to rise in 2018”

Healthy Heart Market offering shipping discount

Healthy Heart Market is a good place to shop online for low-salt offerings you can’t find in local stores. I turned to it extensively after my 2012 angioplasty as I dropped salt, fat and sugar from my daily eating routine.

 

 

 

Continue reading “Healthy Heart Market offering shipping discount”

If you believe foods can speed your metabolism, try these

I did better with the second four — black pepper, oily fish, water and broccoli. Broccoli is everywhere on my low-salt, low-sugar, low-fat diet. Check my recipe page for different ways to make it.

Claims about foods and superfoods come and go, so I usually don’t put a lot of faith into anyone touting any food as helping with your health or specific aspects of it. But I tend to be more skeptical than most on the subject.

Put the trimmed broccoli in the steamer basket, cover and set the timer to the recommended cooking time.
My take on broccoli for Thanksgiving — steam it

So when I recently read this piece on 8 Foods That Can Help You Speed Up Your Metabolism I decided I’d share it with you all and you can decide whether you believe it or not. As we age, our metabolisms supposedly slow down, making it more difficult to maintain a healthy weight. So maybe these can help a bit. Continue reading “If you believe foods can speed your metabolism, try these”

Think you’re eating healthy? Think again

Read every label and don’t buy foods, whether at a supermarket or restaurant, if you can’t see nutrition information.

When I first met with a nutritionist to discuss health eating after my 2012 angioplasty, I brought along four pages of foods I liked to eat. She told me one by one that they were all unhealthy. Most had too much of one or more of what I call the evil triangle of American food — sugar, salt or fat.

My low-salt, low-fat, low-sugar pantry.
My low-salt, low-fat, low-sugar pantry. Are these healthy? For me, they are. Read every label before buying any food products.

This blog is the result of that meeting and of my attempt to keep eating foods I find tasty while cutting out the evil triangle. But it is extremely tough in a world of so many mixed food messages. That point was brought home to me by a recent piece I read on npr.org headlined 75 Percent of Americans Say They Eat Healthy — Despite Evidence To The Contrary. Continue reading “Think you’re eating healthy? Think again”