NoSaltNoFatNoSugar.com achieves all-time high view total in January

More people are finding us and hearing our message. January was a record month, in fact, for views of our site. NoSaltNoFatNoSugar.com had 6,174 views in January from 3,243 visitors.

The mission for this blog since I started it in late 2012 has been to help people with health issues eat tasty, satisfying food rather than just the bland stuff nutritionists propose after a major health incident such as my angioplasty in 2012.

Those in my family who have died from heart attacks. I miss them all.
Those in my family who have died from heart attacks. I miss them all.

But helping people is only possible if they’re listening, otherwise I’m just another tree falling in the forest, unknown and unseen and not helping anyone.

So it’s been gratifying to see our visitor traffic building year after year. More people are finding us and hearing our message. January was a record month, in fact, for views of our site. NoSaltNoFatNoSugar.com had 6,174 views in January from 3,243 visitors. Continue reading “NoSaltNoFatNoSugar.com achieves all-time high view total in January”

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Let’s talk heart attacks for a minute…just a minute

The WebMD list has 16 triggers, as if the AARP list isn’t worrisome enough, that starts with lack of sleep and moves on to migraines (also on the AARP list), cold weather, air pollution and strong emotions!

Regular readers of my blog know I began this after having angioplasty to open an 80% blocked artery very close to my heart. Doctors told me I did not have a heart attack but had come very, very close on the day when I felt the pressure on my chest and it seemed like air had stopped reaching my lungs.

A graphic view of angioplasty
A graphic view of angioplasty

So while this blog is about eating no salt, no sugar, no fat recipes and no salt, no sugar, no fat restaurant meals, if you can find them, I continue to watch news about heart disease. Recently two different e-mails came to me listing heart attack triggers, one from AARP and the other from WebMD. Continue reading “Let’s talk heart attacks for a minute…just a minute”

My Diet is Better than Yours: episode update and review

It does bring up a good point though — each of our bodies is unique and what works for one person often does not work for another.

I blogged recently about the new ABC show, My Diet is Better than Yours. I’m not sure I’ll write about it every week, but thought enough happened last week to write about it again here.

A second so-called fitness/diet expert got booted by the person she was trying to train. The cLean Momma Diet is history for this season, it seems, and the advocate of it got a bit testy when she got the boot, blaming her contestant for not following the plan. Really, sour grapes? Bad form, I’d say.

The No diet Plan is , so far, my favorite, but it does have a diet component, drop the processed foods and eat more fruits and veggies -- not exactly rocket science but something most people have trouble doing.
The No diet Plan is , so far, my favorite, but it does have a diet component, drop the processed foods and eat more fruits and veggies — not exactly rocket science but something most people have trouble doing.

It does bring up a good point though — each of our bodies is unique and what works for one person often does not work for another.  Continue reading “My Diet is Better than Yours: episode update and review”

2015 — a setback year in my battle against fat and sugar

I gained 14 pounds over the course of the year, but six pounds of that came in December thanks to a trip to the place of my birth, New York City, where I ate all the foods I grew up loving — all high in fat, sugar, salt and calories.

My 2012 angioplasty set me on a path to change my eating habits to lessen the chance of future heart problems. I went on to drop nearly 30 pounds over the first two years after the surgery.

But 2015 proved a setback year for me, so much so that last week I went out to buy some 40-inch-waist pants again, after having thrown out the ones I had back in 2012.

Nathan's hot dogs and waffle fries, wondrous stuff.
Nathan’s hot dogs and waffle fries, wondrous stuff that led to my gaining six pounds in four days of New York City eating

Studies have pointed to increased risk fo heart problems for men with waists larger than 38 or 39 inches.

I’ve hovered between 38 and 40 most of my adult life, getting as high as a 44 at one point. I find my equilibrium waist, the size I feel most comfortable with, is normally around 39, which puts me in dubious territory heart-wise.

So what happened last year? I got tired of always being hungry, for one thing. Also, a variety of external stress factors as the year wore on simply wore down my resolve to eat well.

I gained 14 pounds over the course of the year, but six pounds of that came in December thanks to a trip to the place of my birth, New York City, where I ate all the foods I grew up loving — all high in fat, sugar, salt and calories.

My eating binge continued into the Christmas-New Year’s holidays as I once again ate chocolate and candies I have largely given up.

With a new year here now, it’s time for me to jump back on the low-salt, low-fat, low-sugar bandwagon, which will mean  a return to hunger pangs but, also hopefully, a return to a smaller waist size as I drop enough pounds to go back to my 38-inch-waist pants.

John

 

Another knock on processed meats, this one from WHO

Processed meats, such as hot dogs and cold cuts, are full of sodium and other things that have led me and many others to avoid them in recent years. I’m always amused by Subway calling its sandwiches healthy when they’re filled with high-sodium processed meats, for example.

Nathan's hot dogs and waffle fries, wondrous stuff.
Nathan’s hot dogs and waffle fries, wondrous stuff.

Another knock on processed meats came from the World Health Organization (WHO) recently. It pointed to a link between an increased likelihood of cancer and the consumption of processed meats. The report also threw in red meat as a possible cancer causer. Continue reading “Another knock on processed meats, this one from WHO”

Rice bread — a nice low-salt alternative if you’re craving toast

This bread is a good example of how completely my life has changed since my angioplasty in 2012. I used to go on trips and bring home chocolates and snack cakes in my suitcase. This time, I had a loaf of rice bread.

I posted recently about trying rice toast on a recent visit with my son and daughter-in-law in Minnesota’s Twin Cities. I had the toast at  a farm-to-table place called the Co-Op Creamery.

My rice bread find from Minneapolis. A nice low-salt alternative to high-sodium white breads.
My rice bread find from Minneapolis. A nice low-salt alternative to high-sodium white breads.

Not sure what the nutritional profile was for rice bread, I sought it out later in my visit while we were shopping at the Seward Co-op my son belongs to and shops at.

Sure enough, I found some in the bread section and was pleasantly surprised to see it is a low-salt alternative to traditional wheat breads. Continue reading “Rice bread — a nice low-salt alternative if you’re craving toast”

A festival of fennel recipes from Bon Appetit

Lamb aside, hats off to Bon Appetit for this roundup.

Fennel is one of the ethnic foods of my Italian-American youth that suddenly has gone mainstream Americana. I’ve written about my love of it here, so I was thrilled to see this Bon Appetit piece entitled 33 Recipes That Make Us Fall for Fennel All Over Again.

Plum-fennel salad is the first and has me intrigued already. Shrimp salad with fennel  and cucumber also looks good, just leave out the salt as I do with most recipes.

Fennel at Trader Joe's is a convenient package. Fennel is normlaly a fall product but many stores now stock it year-round.
Fennel at Trader Joe’s is a convenient package. Fennel is normlaly a fall product but many stores now stock it year-round.

Some of the recipes sound great but wouldn’t fit with my post-angioplasty diet, like the luscious-looking leg of lamb. I miss fatty, juicy lamb.

Leg of lamb was the Easter Sunday dinner I was cooking back in 1986 when my father died of a heart attack at my home. I’ve seldom cooked it since, and not at all in the past three years since my surgery.

Lamb aside, hats off to Bon Appetit for this roundup.

John