More low-salt, low-fat Thanksgiving side dishes

Turkey day is almost here and lots of you already have come to our site searching for low-salt turkeys and low-salt stuffing recipes. We also have recipes for low-salt side dishes, but went looking for more and found some that sound tasty in a big Thanksgiving roundup done by Bon Appetit magazine.

Roasted carrots with red onions, fennel and mint is the first. I’m not usually a giant mint fan, but here I might make an exception…or I might just leave out the mint along with leaving out the added salt recommended here to make this a low-salt recipe.

Here’s what you’ll need:

2 pounds small carrots (about 2 bunches), peeled, cut into 3-inch pieces
2 large red onions, each cut through root end into 8 wedges
1 fennel bulb, cut into ½-inch wedges
4 tablespoons olive oil, divided
Kosher salt, freshly ground pepper  [leave out the salt]
2 tablespoons raw sunflower seeds
1 teaspoon coriander seeds, coarsely chopped
½ teaspoon Aleppo pepper or a pinch of crushed red pepper flakes
½ teaspoon Hungarian hot paprika
2 tablespoons Sherry vinegar or red wine vinegar
1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice
2 tablespoons torn mint leaves

I normally link to the original page but some readers have complained about that, so here’s the instructions as well: Continue reading “More low-salt, low-fat Thanksgiving side dishes”

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Here’s your low-sodium Thanksgiving menu!!!

You don’t have to go salt crazy on Thanksgiving, you can still enjoy the day with these low-sodium Thanksgiving recipes.

Thanksgiving is sneaking up on me this year as I’m just finishing up another long-term project. So I started my Thanksgiving menu food shopping yesterday. My first item, a low-salt fresh turkey at Costco.

You can read my past writing on low sodium Thanksgiving turkey, never buy a self-basting turkey, those are loaded with salt!!! Read the label before buying any turkey. Many, many have salt added. A regular turkey will have only about 70 mgs of sodium a serving, not hundreds.

You don’t have t spend a ton for a low-sodium turkey either. As I said, I bought

Always check the salt content of any turkey you want to buy. Many, including pre-packed turkey breasts, are loaded with salt.
Always check the salt content of any turkey you want to buy. Many, including pre-packed turkey breasts, are loaded with salt.

mine at Costco for 99 cents a pound. True some stores have other turkeys cheaper, but 99 cents a pound isn’t bad to get the salt out. Continue reading “Here’s your low-sodium Thanksgiving menu!!!”

Low-salt, low-sugar barbecue chicken with a garlic kick

My quest for low-salt, low-sugar ketchup led me to try Doc’s a while back but I’ve written about how it was too spicy for my tastes. Rather than throw out the bottle, however, I’ve been saving it to use as a barbecue sauce, figuring the spiciness would work better for such usage.

Ingredients for my barbecue garlic chicken.
Ingredients for my barbecue garlic chicken.

 

I thought about it as I was preparing to bake some chicken breasts recently and, after looking to see what else was in my pantry and refrigerator, hit upon the idea of mixing it with a Localfolks barbecue sauce that I’d found tasty but quite mild.  Continue reading “Low-salt, low-sugar barbecue chicken with a garlic kick”

No-salt Christmas gifts? Here’s some suggestions

If you’re looking for the perfect gift for someone you know on a low-salt, low-fat diet, check these out. They’d be fun to find under the tree.

Healthy Heart Market has variety of low-salt and low-fat items. I’ve written about one product from there in the past. I initially bought items from it after my 2012 angioplasty, but haven’t in more recent days as I find more items locally, saving me the shipping costs of ordering online.

Gift boxes from Heart Healthy Market
Gift boxes from Heart Healthy Market

But I’m still on the Healthy Heart Market e-mail list, so I was intrigued to recently get something from there advertising gift boxes for Christmas. Boxes include one for soups, another for condiments, even as Asian box — a good trick since Asian food is notoriously high in sodium. The Asian box includes one of my favorite product, Mrs. Dash teriyaki marinade.

Continue reading “No-salt Christmas gifts? Here’s some suggestions”

Yogurt toast revisited — tried it, loved it

I’ll be eating this morning treat again.

Yogurt toast was the subject of a recent blog post of mine after I saw it written about in Bon Appetit. It looked and sounded tasty so I vowed to try it.

Yogurt toast with Yoplait Greek 100 Boston Cream Pie flavored yogurt.
Yogurt toast with Yoplait Greek 100 Boston Cream Pie flavored yogurt.

I have tried it and I loved it. Rather than regular bread, I used Thomas’ multigrain English muffins which are lower in salt and carbs than plain bread. I tried it with two different fat-free Greek yogurts I buy. One comes from Yoplait and is flavored to resemble Boston Cream pie, a long-time favorite I can’t eat on my low-fat diet. Slathering it on a toasted English muffin gave the whole dish a cakey taste, it was almost like having cake again!

Yogurt toast with Dannon Greek light raspberry chocolate yogurt.
Yogurt toast with Dannon Greek light raspberry chocolate yogurt.

I also tried a raspberry chocolate Greek Yogurt from Dannon, a fat-free, low-sugar variety in this case. It also was very tasty. The Greek yogurts, because they’re heavier than regular yogurt, add some heft to the muffin. And one yogurt container could easily cover two muffins if necessary.

I’ll be eating this morning treat again.
John

Doc’s Gourmet Ketchup — not a low-salt favorite of mine

All the low-salt, low-sugar ketchups I’ve found are considerably more expensive than regular brands, so if you buy one, the taste should work for you, it’s too expensive to buy something you’ll ultimately not use. Sorry Doc.

Ketchup is a must-have condiment for me, but traditional brands are loaded with salt and sugar, so I’m constantly on the lookout for low-salt alternatives. I’ve already done a taste test of two brands, Westbrae and LocalFolks.

Recently I tried another brand, Doc’s Gourmet Ketchup. Doc’s has 65 mgs of sodium and 3 grams of sugar in a tablespoon compared with LocalFolks which has 25 mgs of sodium and 2 grams of sugar, so ingredient-wise it’s already at a disadvantage. I recently did a side-by-side test of the two on turkey meatloaf I made.

Doc's ketchup, on the right, is brown, not red like LocalFolks, on the left. Doc's also doesn't taste like ketchuo.
Doc’s ketchup, on the right, is brown, not red like LocalFolks, on the left. Doc’s also doesn’t taste like ketchuo.

The Doc’s was severely disappointing, tasting more like a peppery barbecue sauce than a tomato ketchup. It’s brown color belies its barbecue sauce taste as does the liquid smoke listed as an ingredient. I don’t want to throw the remainder of it away, so I’m saving it to use on some chicken that I grill this summer to see if it tastes better as a barbecue sauce than as a ketchup.

All the low-salt, low-sugar ketchups I’ve found are considerably more expensive than regular brands, so if you buy one, the taste should work for you, it’s too expensive to buy something you’ll ultimately not use. Sorry Doc.
John

America’s big food companies are hearing us, a little bit

But there is an entire generation coming of age now that doesn’t want processed foods, period. It’s a back to basics movement both my adult children seem to have embraced, and I applaud them for it.

My hunt for low-salt,low-fat, low-sugar foods has been a tough one in the two and a half years since my angioplasty, but little by little I am finding items and blogging about them here to help you kick the evil triangle of salt, fat and sugar as I am trying to do. Just check my ingredient and recipe pages for help.

Turkey meatball ingredients include lean ground turkey, panko breadcrumbs, low-fat cheese and Italian seasoning.
Lower-fat, lower-salt packaged products are out there, you just need to hunt for them.

A recent article in the Washington Post gave me some hope that America’s major food processing companies may slowly be getting the message that consumer tastes are changing. The piece noted that several major companies, such as Kraft and Kellogg, have seen earnings fall in recent quarters. Continue reading “America’s big food companies are hearing us, a little bit”