FDA salt guidelines will shake up the food industry: a guest post

On average, Americans consume about 3,400 milligrams of sodium a day – 33% more than the FDA’s recommended intake and 50% more than what the American Heart Association advises. Such unhealthy eating habits increase the risk of high blood pressure, heart disease and stroke.

This is a guest post that crossed my desk at my day job writing for a healthcare magazine. I asked for permission to use it on my personal blog, hoping it will help others wrestling with getting the salt out of their diets, as I am. It was supplied to me by Diane O’Donnell, senior public relations specialist at the North Shore-LIJ Health System in Great Neck, N.Y. A video also is available, simply click here to see it.

New FDA guidelines aimed at reducing the level of sodium that food companies and restaurants put in their fare can’t come soon enough for one New York nutrition expert.

Demon salt. keep it out of your diet.
Demon salt. keep it out of your diet.

“This is a long time coming,” said Nancy Copperman, a registered dietitian and corporate director of Public Health Initiatives for the North Shore-LIJ Health System. “Much of the sodium that we eat is hidden in foods, and we don’t realize how much we get from just the processed foods that we buy,”

She added that while national chain restaurants often provide nutrition information about their offerings, finding out how much sodium is in a dish at your local diner or restaurant can be difficult.

On average, Americans consume about 3,400 milligrams of sodium a day – 33% more than the FDA’s recommended intake and 50% more than what the American Heart Association advises. Such unhealthy eating habits increase the risk of high blood pressure, heart disease and stroke.
In addition to satisfying our taste buds, salt is used to preserve the shelf life of food, prevent bacteria growth and to improve the texture and appearance of food.

So what are some healthy alternatives to salt?

“There’s light salt, which is potassium chloride vs. sodium chloride,” said Ms. Copperman. “You can add fresh herbs, such as tarragon, dill, basil and cumin to give foods flavor, and you can also use lemon for seasoning.”

The FDA has not set a date for implementing the guidelines, which will be voluntary.

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2 thoughts on “FDA salt guidelines will shake up the food industry: a guest post”

  1. Oh God feeding us on so much salt just tp preserve the shelf life of food and improve texture and appearance of food. How gross. Fortunately, I don’t eat out a lot. Thanks for sharing!

    1. Salt in foods has become my great nemesis. Just yesterday, we were at a restaurant where I told the waiter I was on a low-salt diet and I then was told I shouldn’t order one item I had wanted because it came pre-salted!!!! Terrible disappointment.

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