Eating out and salt: always, always say ‘no added salt’

Eating out is a constant challenge on a no salt, no fat, no sugar diet. Nutritionists have told me to stop because it’s just not possible. But I continue to find places that either cook with no salt, or will if you ask when you’re ordering.

Recently, though, while we were visiting my son and daughter-in-law in St. Paul, Mn., I forgot to ask one night and paid the salt price for it.

My salty tuna with asparagus and sauce underneath, a nice presentation

My salty tuna with asparagus and sauce underneath, a nice presentation

We were at a place called Scusi in St. Paul, a charming little neighborhood place that was packed on the Friday night we went.

The menu has some interesting offerings, including a tuna entree I thought would fit into my diet, given that fatty fish are not only ok, but encouraged for their supposed good fats.

It didn’t occur to me the fish would be salted before cooking. I never salt fish at home but that’s not a measure of how restaurants cook, I quickly was reminded.

When you’ve successfully cut back on salt as I have, I’m down to about 1,200 mgs a day sometimes less to help keep my blood pressure under control, a salty dish becomes a major assault on your tongue. Salt in amounts higher than I’m now accustomed to actually feels like it’s burning my tongue these days.

That’s what the first bite of tuna did to me. I quickly cut off the outer layer of the fish and ate the rest. I could still taste some salt, but not the full load I’d gotten.

I’m not faulting the restaurant, food there was quite good. I’m saying always say “no added salt,” when you order out. Cooks add it to everything, thinking it enhances flavor. But if you’re off it, it will do just the opposite.
John

Scusi on Urbanspoon

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